My Baby Can’t Read, so I’m Suing…

I remember sitting propped up on my bed on bed-rest watching the Your Baby Can Read Commercials. I felt pressured to purchase the $200 video set because I didn’t want my kids to be at a disadvantage when they entered school. I convinced myself that by kindergarten all of the other kids would be reading. Nevertheless, I waited to purchase the set when my kids were 4 months old. A friend and I were watching TV when the commercial came on again and she looked at me and I looked at her. Then with her encouragement I went online and placed my order.

Now, three years later according to ABC 13, the company founded and created by Dr. Robert Titzer , Your Baby Can Read is going out of business (Source). I wasn’t shocked to hear the news, although I liked their product. Yes, I said it. I liked Your Baby Can Read. No, I am not in favor of propping your 3 month old baby in front of a TV all day. On the contrary, for less than 30 minutes a day and with no other TV, the program worked for one of my daughters. However, here is where I recognize the fault within the product,  I have twins and only 1 child learned to read well while using the system. They were both exposed to it at the same time, I followed the off-screen flash cards and more traditional methods as well. At the ages of 1 and 2 years old only one of my daughters could actually read a book through. Even though at first it seemed like they were learning at the same pace. After several months I realized my other child only knew the words from the videos and cards. Their reading levels were noticeably different, but they both had the same advantages.

I will also note,  while watching the DVD after 6-8 months one of my children seemed to connect with it more than the other, which is probably why the system worked for her.  I also realize that my children have vastly different learning styles as well. Thus at around 28 months I stopped using the program altogether to focus on phonetics and off-screen reading comprehension. I basically, let them read early learning books and decreased TV time altogether.

My daughter who did not thrive on the program better understood when I phonetically reviewed words with her. While both could read some, only one child left the program showing similar results as the commercials. I believe, the program was more work than some anticipated, hoping to give their child a head start without going through the one-on-one flash cards. If a child is interested in the videos and willing to allow you to work with him or her to do the games and cards, the Your Baby Can Read system will work. If not, it isn’t going to work. Now, both of my children are reading, but I can’t help but wonder is this law suit against Your Baby Can Read similar to the Nutella lawsuit where the claimants divided $3 million because of misleading advertisements (Source)?

After hearing about the lawsuit, my first thought was, “Man there goes my Ebay resell value.”

What are your thoughts, did you use Your Baby Can Read?

(Visited 11 time, 1 visit today)
Share this Story

Related Posts

2 Comments

  1. Lydia Hubbell

    March 10, 2013 at 6:24 pm

    I am so sorry to hear about this. I just now heard about the lawsuit and started looking up info about it. Babies CAN read but not all babies WILL read. People CAN stop smoking,lose weight, eat healthfully, or control their temper, but if they don’t, does it make sense to punish someone who believes you can and encourages you and sells you products that have helped many others to do those things? I used Glenn Doman’s “You Can Teach Your Baby to Read” with my 2 kids who are now teenagers. I believe prenatal and infant stimulation are helpful. I was one of the mothers who read to and sang to and played music for and massaged my babies before they were born and continued afterwards. My teenagers are considered to be academically gifted and consistently in the top 5% or better on standardized tests. In fact, my son just scored at or better than the level of 100% of kids his grade level in math. His reading level was tested in first grade and they didn’t tell me what level he was actually reading on because they only tested as far as the 5th grade level. I have a 4 year old daughter who is reading “I Can Read” books like, “Frog and Toad,” independently. I occasionally help her with a word, but for the most part, she is reading and understanding and can discuss the stories with me. My children were reading out loud by 15-18 months and before then it is extremely difficult to “test” them. In my experience, children are not always ready and willing to perform like trained seals. It is terribly unfair for Robert Titzer to be treated this way. He had tremendous success with his own children and wanted to share the gift of early reading with children all over. I did buy the YBCR and used it with my youngest. I cannot say that it is more effective than the Glenn Doman method, but it is as effective and a great deal more convenient. All my children watched a good bit of educational television as well, But the most important thing I have done with my kids is to give them time and attention. I listen to them, talk to them and spent many hours reading aloud to them. Robert Titzer was obviously very involved in his children’s lives. He didn’t JUST have them sit in front of a TV or computer monitor. I do know that some kids cannot read the written word. Some kids are blind. Some kids have other problems. But I do believe all normal, healthy children can read and should read. I think the so-called “experts” who think babies cannot read need to spend more time with the children who are doing it. Reading is a complex process. Comprehension is limited by a person’s age and experience in some ways. My daughter who read Harry Potter in second grade got a whole lot more out of it when she read it as a high-schooler. Visual discrimination and memorization are important. My son isn’t as interested in reading as my daughter is, but he reads on an “advanced” level, even as a 14 year old. My 15 year old daughter, on the other hand, always has her nose in a book. I noticed very early (like at 2 or 3 years old) that even though my son could read, he preferred that I read to him, but my daughter at that age enjoyed reading to me! All kids are not the same, but I am firmly convinced that there was no false advertising going on and this company did a lot more good than has been acknowledged.

    Reply

    • elle

      March 11, 2013 at 9:27 pm

      Thank you for your comment. I agree with you and I thank Dr. Titzer for his system. I am sorry that people were so angry. I actually bought the system at full cost and I made sure I got my money’s worth. My kids have been ready for 3 years now and they are 4. I am satisfied with the results. Blessings to you and your family!

      Reply

Leave a Reply